Scam or what?

I have received mails to my TidBits subscriber mail address that purport to enter into some business arrangements with TidBits, as if I would have anything to do with TidBits (aside from being a reader).
I am curious if others have received such mails, and if it’s a scam or misguided souls?
Regards,
Francisco

Can you post a screenshot or forward some to me? I’m curious what they look like.

Unfortunately, no.
I deleted it

Francisco

They mailed again to me:

From: Kathiya Cant <kathiyacant@gmail.com>

Subject: Re: Content Ideas for your tidbits.com

Date: 25 January 2023, 08:58:50 GMT-3

To: TO ME
Any update for this email?
I’m waiting for your reply.

On Mon, Jan 16, 2023 at 6:13 PM Kathiya Cant <kathiyacant@gmail.com> wrote:

Do you happen to have any updates for this email?

I’m waiting for your response.

Thank you

A TRACKING CODE I ELIMINATED

On Fri, Dec 30, 2022 at 3:07 PM Kathiya Cant <kathiyacant@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

We were looking for people we could partner with for content and we came across your

tidbits.com

Do you accept guest posts and link insertion on your websites?

Please let us know the reasonable price in USD. I will pay you via PayPal.

Thanks.

A TRACKING CODE I ELIMINATED

Thanks and Regards

Kathiya Cant

This is the phishing style of the week. In my day job as an InfoSec Analyst, we get hundreds of these forwarded to us daily from curious users.

ALWAYS a scam, delete immediately.

My 82-year-old mother just last night told me I needed to help her buy something on amazon for a friend. That alone made me suspicious. Sure enough, she’d gotten an email from an old friend she hadn’t heard from in decades, who’d emailed and wanted help buying an amazon gift card.

I showed her how the email was quite generic, with no personal details, with odd typos and strange punctuation, and didn’t sound like her friend.

Unfortunately, she’d already responded positively to the friend, saying she’d get my help in buying the gift card. Scammer wrote back this morning thanking her and telling her to send it to a completely different email address (not her friend’s email address), which I’d predicted.

My mom didn’t actually do anything – thankfully buying stuff online is beyond her capabilities – but it was a bit scary how she’d exchanged a series of emails with the scammer, who continued to pretend to be her friend without actually saying anything real.

What made this scheme almost work was that my mom had just sent out Christmas cards and this friend was included, so she was excited to hear from him and reacted with emotion, not thought. She should know better, especially with red flags such as wanting a gift card, but that’s why these things work.

I’m not sure I know of a solution other than having her check with me before she takes any action, but that’s tough if its phishing as I can picture her blithely giving away personal info without realizing it.

2 Likes

Thanks! Yeah, posts like this are a now-common form of spam. I don’t really know what they’re trying to achieve since I used to engage a bit when I still thought they were real. I never got very far.

Another case of this. :frowning:

I got this too. I deleted it w/o thinking twice. Wasn’t anything I was interested in even if it was legit, didn’t ponder it that far.

I also send them to the trash. But I started wondering how they expect a random user of a site can be scammed selling them advertising

Francisco Hirsch