Recording the screen


(John Burt) #1

Recording the screen. Out of necessity (bad TV signal) I figured out how to use Toast 16 Titanium to record the screen. It made an MOV file from an hour long full screen browser stream - Very clear, good audio. But the computer cannot be touched during the recording because all actions are recorded. Toast can also convert to other file formats.

I still need an MP4 editor though.


(Curtis Wilcox) #2

If you just need to trim the beginning and end of the .mov recording, QuickTime Player can do that. iMovie can do more.

QuickTime Player can also make screen recordings, the trick is getting it to record audio from the system itself instead of the computer’s microphone. This article explains how to use the free system extension Soundflower to send the audio to QuickTime (Soundflower is older but definitely works on High Sierra, don’t know about Mojave yet).


(John Burt) #3

Thanks. Toast can edit the head and tail and I have to use Toast for other things so I will stick with it. Sadly I’ve never been able to make any sense out of the modern iMovie. I still use Sierra. High Sierra caused Canvas to crash too often.


#4

If you have an iPhone or iPad you can use it as the ‘source’ for recording. That means you get sound and video. Very easy.

Just attach your iPhone/iPad to your Mac with the USB Lighting cable etc… On the Mac, choose ‘New Movie Recording’ from QuickTime’s File menu. Then choose your iPhone/iPad as video source from the drop-down arrow next to the red recording button in the QuickTime player window. Also choose for sound.

Sound is the only confusing bit … I can imagine why it could be this way … but anyway … You will NOT hear the sound during recording, however it is perfect via playback.

Once you have recorded what you want, save the file. If you want to convert to mp4, this is built-in to the MacOS. In the Finder, click on your mov using the Contextual Menu and choose ‘Encode Selected Video Files’ from the Services menu. You will have a choice for quality settings etc. The resultant file for most choices, is an m4v file, which is Apple’s version of mp4, but includes DRM protection.


(John Burt) #5

That was interesting. Thanks.


(James R Cutler) #6

There is a volume control on the movie recording window. Slide the knob to the right. Then the sound will play through.


#7

I get no recorded sound when I do that.


(morwen) #8

If you have Mojave there is a whole ton of screen recording options new in there.

Record the entire screen

  1. Click in the onscreen controls. Your pointer changes to a camera .
  2. Click any screen to start recording that screen, or click Record in the onscreen controls.
  3. Use the thumbnail to trim, share, save, or take other actions.

Record a selected portion of the screen

  1. Click the Record Selected Portion button in the onscreen controls.

  2. Drag to select an area of the screen to record. To move the entire selection, drag from within the selection.

  3. To start recording, click Record in the onscreen controls.

  4. To stop recording, click the Stop Recording button in the menu bar. Or press Command-Control-Esc (Escape).

  5. Use the thumbnail to trim, share, save, or take other actions.

Way more info https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208721


(Curtis Wilcox) #9

I think the screen recording options available in Mojave by pressing Shift-Command-5 are the same as those already in QuickTime Player, it’s just a quicker way to access them.