Dr. Dre’s Apple Music Series ‘Vital Signs’ Shelved Due to Graphic Content – Rolling Stone


#1

I don’t remember which stars, but I do remember reading that some of the Carpool Karoke guests were ticked off that bad words they used during filming were edited out:

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/dr-dre-apple-music-series-vital-signs-728252/

Disney has done quite well with family oriented content. But I don’t understand why Tim Cook didn’t anticipate that Dr. Drew would develop anything other than X rated content.


(Adam Engst) #2

I’m not surprised that Apple is uncomfortable with having its name associated with “graphic content,” but how different is it than a lot of the other content in the iTunes Store or in Apple Music?


(Simon) #3

This is going to be a tough one for Tim. :smiley: Netflix et al. don’t have any such reservations.


(Tommy Weir) #4

Apple are in a spot here. The music dna they took in with the Beats acquisition never sat well internally I’m willing to bet. The content development is headed up by Cue who seems to be asleep (at times literally) at the wheel. It’s all a bit chaotic to my eye. Especially in a field with sure footed movers like Netflix, Prime, HBO and Hulu.


#5

What’s very different from the other streaming services is that over a billion people own iPhones, and hundreds of millions more own one or more Apple devices. Like Apple’s other services, it’s something that could make iPhone, Mac and iPad more useful and valuable to buyers and bring in more revenue to the company.

They have the ability to put together a 360 degree content play - music, video, magazines, news, and maybe even cut deals with book publishers. They’ve already hired an impressive group of veteran and emerging film and broadcast talent. Apple have a big enough cash hoard to spend, enough to afford to keep going throughout the learning curve. They also have a built in global audience and many avenues to promote it.

And If it looks like the exclusive video content route isn’t paying off for them, they can always buy a studio.


(Tommy Weir) #6

All very true. It does feel like a learning curve. We will see.

A partnership with Disney aside, it is difficult to identify what external match would coincide with Apple ‘values’, at least how I see them. Interesting that Netflix have migrated to making some almost network like shows as opposed to their alt-HBO initial offerings. The field is in flux. Apple can certainly play the long game.


#7

This was an absolutely brilliant move by Netflix. From the day they began their streaming service they had a substantial library of content for pre-k, kids, teens and tweens. When they began producing their own, they jumped in on these markets too. It was a unique and very effective selling point at the time; for less than the cost of an HBO subscription everyone in the family could choose from a very substantial, high quality library anytime and anywhere, and they also had shows like Stranger Things that appeals to the whole family. They quickly began producing their own content for every age group once House Of Cards became a success.

HBO is still clambering to catch up, and it’s why the cut a deal with Henson for a big portion of their library + new shows. Now that Disney is launching their own service, HBO, etc. have had a lot to worry about, but since AT&T bought them, they have a mandate to build out their content from their CEO:

“I want more hours of engagement. Why are more hours of engagement important?” he continued. “Because you get more data and information about a customer that then allows you to do things like monetize through alternate models of advertising as well as subscriptions, which I think is very important to play in tomorrow’s world.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/08/business/media/hbo-att-merger.html

Personally, I’m glad Apple is focused on privacy.